Team Up for Success

Find free tools and resources to help you partner up for your child’s success throughout the school year.  

Team Up for Success
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  1. 1

    Introduce Your Family to the New Teacher this Fall

    Use the “Dear Teacher” letter at the beginning of the school year to connect with your child’s teacher this fall. Once complete, share this letter with the teacher so they get to know you and your child early on!

  2. 2

    Work with Your Child’s Teacher

    Using the Parent-Teacher Planning Tool, you can form a two-way relationship with your child’s teacher, setting goals and sharing progress this Fall. Use this tool in advance of parent-teacher conferences. 

  3. 3

    See How Your Child is Doing in Reading and Math

    Get a quick gut check on how your child is doing in math and reading using the free Readiness Check.

    To start, select your child’s previous grade, which subject you’d like to review and have them answer fun short questions. 

  4. 4

    Get on the Path to Success to High School and Beyond

    Follow these simple steps with your teen to help make sure they are prepared for high school and beyond.

Helpful "Team Up for Success" Videos

The first video, from WNET, showcases one family’s strategies for connecting home and school. The second video shares why parent-teacher partnership is important and how to use Learning Heroes' Parent-Teacher Planning Tool. The third video, also from WNET, shares how to use the Readiness Check to get a gut check on your child's grade-level skills.

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*A Year into the Pandemic: Parents’ Perspectives on Academics, State Assessments, and Education, Learning Heroes and National PTA

**NAEP, The Nation’s Report Card 2019

Parents Deserve to Know

According to our national survey, nearly 9 in 10 parents believe their child is performing at or above grade level.*

Yet, what percentage of 8th graders nationally are reading at grade level?**

Learn more »